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Newton-Evans Study Indicates Similarities in Plans for Full Digital Substations and Differences for Condition-Based Maintenance Programs Among Electric Utilities

Newton-Evans Research Company continues to assess findings from its six-month research study and survey of protective relay usage patterns in the world community of electric power utilities. Insights received from 114 large and mid-sized utilities in 28 countries point to some interesting differences in plans for implementation of the “full digital substation” concept and to increased use of condition-based maintenance (CBM) strategies for protective relays.

Implementation of the “Full Digital Substation” Concept:
Thirty-four percent of the survey respondents from the U.S. and Canada agreed with the statement, “By year end 2018, we will be well on our way toward implementing the full digital substation concept.” Thirty-seven percent disagreed with the statement. Forty percent of small North American utilities (fewer than 100,000 customers) agreed with the statement, but only 18% of large utilities (more than 500,000 customers) concurred.

Forty-three percent of the international respondents agreed with the same statement, which is slightly more than what was observed in North America (34%). Twenty-five percent had no opinion, and another 25% disagreed. Importantly, the typical international utility respondent was somewhat larger (in terms of customers served) than their North American counterpart.

“By year end 2018, we will be well on our way toward implementing the full digital substation concept”

Continue reading Newton-Evans Study Indicates Similarities in Plans for Full Digital Substations and Differences for Condition-Based Maintenance Programs Among Electric Utilities

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Newton-Evans Study Finds Market for Relay-Centric Devices and Controls Expanding with Emergence and Growth of Newer Industry Segments

Newton-Evans Research Company continues to assess the results of its six-month research study of protective relay usage patterns in the world community of electric power utilities. Findings from 114 large and mid-size utilities in 28 countries point to some newer trends in adoption and use of protection and control technology.

Importance of Purchasing “Known” Relays: Sixty-five percent of the North American respondents strongly agreed with the statement, “It is important that we purchase known relays (a proven product with which we have had prior experience).” Overall, 97% of North American respondents strongly agreed (65%) or agreed (32%). Three people were neutral about this statement. None of the respondents expressed any level of disagreement. Eighty-two percent of North American utilities serving more than 500,000 electricity end users strongly agreed with this statement.

Fifty-three percent of international respondents strongly agreed with this statement. Forty-one percent agreed only somewhat. One person disagreed and one person was neutral about this statement.

Agree or Disagree: “It is important that we purchase known relays (a proven product with which we have had prior experience.)”

Impact:
The role of “purchasing known relays” makes it very difficult for new market entrants to gain a share of this multi-billion-dollar global protective relay market. Similarly, it has become equally difficult for existing relay suppliers to gain new customers unless the relays are components of larger electrical equipment (motors, transformers, switchgear, et al). Despite these market constraints, caused in large part by a steep learning curve in programming and protection settings, some relay manufacturers have increased their market presence through specialization in the design and supply of protective relays for one or more product segments (protection of motors, transformers, generators, switchgear and the like). Other manufacturers have continued to offer a wide range of protection solutions, but address specific world regions or specific types of electric utilities or industries.

Examples of such specialized expertise can be found in many of the companies engaged in the manufacture of protective relays. Witness the success of Beckwith Electric, a market leader in generator protection and now actively engaged in distributed generation protection as well. Basler Electric’s microprocessor-based relays combine multifunction protection with control, metering, data acquisition and network communications. RFL and ERLPhase are two additional specialist participants in the North American and international markets. The global electrical equipment manufacturers with a wide array of protective device offerings include ABB, Eaton, GE, Siemens and Toshiba. Relay-centric manufacturing leaders include the multi-hundred million dollar businesses of the USA’s Schweitzer Engineering Labs (SEL) and the China’s NARI.

So the question now is – how do relay manufacturers grow in a “mature” market for protective devices? The response is this: While the traditional utility and industrial markets for device protection are indeed mature in many countries- there are a host of new relay-centric applications for protective devices that include significant relay-like functions and control-monitoring capabilities and require less complex programming and relay setting procedures. The market requirement to protect distributed energy devices including wind turbines and solar panels continues to grow. The expanding market for distribution automation device controls (capacitor banks, reclosers, line monitors, fault sensors, etc.) provides additional new opportunities for participation by relay manufacturers.

DA: Distribution Automation – Capacitor bank relays, Recloser controls, Fault current limiters
DER: Distributed Energy Resources – Wind turbine relays, Photovoltaic panel relays
ES: Energy Storage – Storage battery relay, AC/DC converter controls
DR: Demand Response – Load control switch relay

For further information on the research series or to order The World Market for Protective Relays in Electric Utilities: 2016-2018 visit our reports page.

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Findings from Newton-Evans 2016 Study of Protective Relay Trends in the World’s Electric Power Utilities Depict a Receptive Market for Incorporating Advanced Technological Capabilities

Global Study Finds Continuing Moderate Growth in Protective Relay Market with Commitment to Improving Protection Coordination and Grid Security Practices

Role of Synchrophasors and Teleprotection Continues to Expand; Provides Better Situational Awareness and Visualization for Control System Operators

Newton-Evans Research Company has completed a six-month research study and survey of protective relay usage patterns in the world community of electric power utilities. Findings from 114 large and md-size utilities in 28 countries point to some newer trends in adoption and use of protection and control technology.

Among the key findings reported in the four-volume study are these:

  • Most new and retrofit relay units being purchased are digital relays, but in some of the protection applications studied, such as motor protection and large generator applications, and in installations where electrical interference is strong, electromechanical and older solid state relays continue to have a niche market position.
  • The annual world market for protective relays and related power systems protection devices continues to grow at a moderate pace that exceeds many other categories of electric utility investments for grid modernization.
  • Manufacturers of protective relays continue to expand their market coverage, with more than 20 firms each enjoying at least some share of the global market.
  • Real-time analysis of synchrophasor data is becoming a major application for the emerging field of operational analytics.
  • Communications protocol usage patterns continue to serve as a key differentiator between large and mid-size North American electric utilities and their international counterparts, as shown in the accompanying chart.

The 2016 Newton-Evans survey of electric utilities includes more than 20 detailed product functionality topics, related technical questions, and market-related issues, together incorporating more than 250 data points of information from each of the participating utilities.

Further information on the research series The World Market for Protective Relays in Electric Utilities: 2016-2018 is available from Newton-Evans Research Company, 10176 Baltimore National Pike, Suite 204, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042. Phone: 410-465-7316 Email: info@newton-evans.com or visit our website for additional information:
http://www.newton-evans.com/relaymarketplacestudy2016-2018

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North American Protective Relay Marketplace: New Report Now Available

Volume One of this 2016 study of protection and control is based on a sample of North American investor-owned, public and cooperative electric power utilities.
The data provides information on a segmented basis by type of utility and by number of customers served. These tables help illustrate occasional important differences in the findings based on the type and size of utility.

The findings in this report are based on survey responses received from 79 electric utilities that include 16 investor-owned, 28 public power, 26 cooperatives, 4 electric power consulting groups, and 5 Canadian electric utilities. This survey was conducted between April and May of 2016. Initial phone calls were placed to utility officials and relay engineers to invite them to complete the survey either as a Microsoft Word attachment via email, or completing an online survey on www.surveymonkey.com. Reminders were sent via email every 2 weeks until the last call deadline was issued.

The 79 utilities participating in this year’s study represent 31 million electricity end users/customers, having 3,340 transmission substations and 7.841 distribution substations covering over 800,000 total T&D line miles. This sample is about 20% of the North American customer base and approximately 15.7% of utility-operated transmission and distribution substations. Newton-Evans has previously estimated that direct shipments to utilities account for about 40% of the overall North American market for protective relays.

Each question in this report contains:

  1. A pie chart or bar chart summarizing how all of the survey participants responded to the question
  2. A table (or series of tables) showing the data by:
    1. Summary: all survey respondents
    2. Investor Owned: investor owned utilities
    3. Public Power: publically owned utilities (municipals, public utility districts, state or federal government)
    4. Cooperative: member owned electric utility cooperatives
    5. Canada: electric companies in Canada
    6. Other/Consultant: respondents representing power technology companies, industrial facilities
    7. <100,000: electric utilities serving fewer than 100,000 customers
    8. 100,000 to 499,999: between 100,000 and 499,999 customers
    9. >=500,000: 500,000 or more customers (either directly via distribution, or indirectly via generation and transmission.)
  3. Some written analysis and observations based on the tables and charts

What approaches are you using to operate a WAN for remote access to relays?
While 24% of the respondents said they don’t operate a WAN for remote relay access, almost half said they connect via serial port terminal servers or data concentrators. Forty percent use firewalls in conjunction with the WAN, while just over one-third said they use routers with encryption or VPN capabilities to access relays over a WAN. Other mentions included “gateways”.

WAN Usage for Remote Access to Relays
relayWANs

Does your utility’s control system use protocol IEC 61850 for Substation Automation, Protection, Control, or SCADA?
Seventeen respondents said they use IEC 61850 in at least one of the four areas. Thirteen percent said they use 61850 within the substation, and another 6% said they plan to use it in the substation by 2018. About 80% of the respondents have no use or plans for IEC 61850 in any area, and 89% said they don’t use or plan to use IEC 61850 for SCADA.

Use/Plans for IEC 61850
IEC61850

What % of your relays have been in service for more than 15 years?
Overall, 55% of survey respondents reported that more than one-half of their protective relays have been in service for more than 15 years. Out of all 76 respondents to this question, twelve said that less than 20% of their installed base is older than 15 years. However, in some cases the useful lifespan of a protective relay is stated as nearly 30 years. There are installations of electro-mechanical relays that have been in operation since the 1960’s according to some utility officials. According to the observations reported in Table 23, two-thirds of relays installed at surveyed IOUs (and nearly two-thirds among Canadian respondents) have been installed for more than 15 years.

Percent of Relays Among Newton-Evans Sample that are >15 years in service
RelaysOver15yrs


To order Volume 1 of The Worldwide Study of the Protective Relay Marketplace in Electric Utilities: 2016-2018 visit our reports page or fax an order form to 1 410 750 7429: www.newton-evans.com/relaymarketplacestudy2016-2018

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Worldwide Study of the Protective Relay Marketplace in Electric Utilities: 2016-2018

The Worldwide Study of the Protective Relay Marketplace in Electric Utilities: 2016-2018, a four volume report series by Newton-Evans Research Company, is scheduled for publication in August 2016. Volume 1 – North American Market is now available.

Overview
Newton-Evans’ Worldwide Study of the Protective Relay Marketplace: 2016-2018 is planned to be a multi-client study which encompasses the world market for protective relays in the electric utility industry. This four volume report series will be the seventh worldwide study of protective relays which Newton-Evans has undertaken. Participants in this market study will include utility engineers and managers from investor-owned utilities, municipal and provincial utilities, cooperative utilities within the United States and Canada, together with national power systems throughout the world. The study will measure current market sizes and contains projections on a world region basis for the next several years. The entire research program will define the product and market requirements which suppliers must meet in order to successfully participate in one or more of these diverse world market regions.

Newton-Evans Research Company estimates from our earlier 2012 relay market study indicate that the North American protective relay market stood at almost $600 million for both utility and industrial applications. It will be important for the P&C community to learn how changes in the world market conditions since 2014 will affect the outlook for 2016-2018.

To read more about this upcoming study and get ordering information, see the brochure page.

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North American Study Finds Continuing Moderate Growth in Protective Relay Market with Commitment to Increasing Protection Coordination and Grid Security Practices

Role of Synchrophasors and Teleprotection Continues to Grow, Providing Better Situational Awareness and Visualization to Help Prevent Outages

Newton-Evans Research Company has prepared an interim news release based on preliminary findings from 59 large and mid-size North American electric utilities.

Among the early trends reported in this first of a four volume set of reports are these:

  1. The percentage of microprocessor relays in the mix of all protective relays used by utilities continues to increase with each passing year.
  2. The vast majority of new and retrofit units being planned for purchased are also digital relays, but in some of the protection applications studied, such as motor protection and large generator applications, and in installations where electrical interference is strong, electromechanical and older solid state relays continue to have a niche market position.
  3. Real-time analysis of synchrophasor data has become a key application for the emerging field of operational analytics for transmission operators.

MicroprocessorRelaysInstalledBasePct
Communications protocol usage patterns in North American utilities of all sizes continue to rely on DNP3, the dominant protocol in use in the North American region. IEC 61850 is found in some of the TOP 100 utilities, but is by no means prevalent as of mid-2016.

Relay redundancy being used for microprocessor-based relaying terminals varies by application as seen in the chart below.

RedundantRelaySchemes2016
The 2016 Newton-Evans survey of electric utilities includes more than 20 detailed product functionality topics, related technical questions, and market-related issues, together incorporating more than 250 items of information from each of the participating utilities.

This year’s study will result in a series of four reports published during June and July. These reports are geared to the planning needs of protective relay suppliers, power industry consultants, and utility protection and control departments. The four volumes include the North American Market Study, the International Market Study, Supplier Profiles, and Global Market Assessment and Outlook.

Further information on the research series The World Market for Protective Relays in Electric Utilities: 2016-2018 is available from Newton-Evans Research Company, 10176 Baltimore National Pike, Suite 204, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042. Phone: 410-465-7316 or visit www.newton-evans.com for additional information or to order the report series online.

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Progress Report on the 2016-2018 Study of Protective Relays

This week the staff at Newton-Evans Research is in the midst of conducting pre-testing of our 2016 survey design with our panel of leading utility contributors. After reviewing the results and feedback from our panel, we will finalize the North American version of the survey and begin requesting participation from utilities, ISO/RTO organizations, industrial firms and rail transport organizations. The pre-testing process will then be undertaken with our international utility panel.

This periodic study was last undertaken in 2012, with guidance provided in the four volume set of reports for the P&C community through 2014. The report series has been relied upon by relay manufacturers, substation automation developers and control systems integrators around the world for more than three decades. The reports are referenced by standards organizations and the operational consulting community looks to the series for guidance on protection and control status, learning where the “real world” of utilities is today and understanding the technical drivers and operational trends that will impact utility and supplier planning over the next few years.

We are hoping to receive participation from more than 100 key electric utilities in this year’s study. Typically we do obtain cooperation from 100 or more utilities. It is more difficult to obtain high levels of cooperation today, with concerns about security and competitive activities. We are trying not to be intrusive in our questioning, so would-be participants can safely and securely provide information without having to be concerned with cyber security policy issues.

The richly illustrated Executive Summary from this new study will be about 40 pages in length and will enable participants to “benchmark” the findings relative to their own P&C activities and plans and compare with other utilities within their size range and utility type.

For interested parties, keep in mind that the pre-publication price offer for the four volume set of report is $5,500.00 through May, 2016. Once the study is published, the report series price will be $5,950.00.

A brochure with order form for the 2016-2018 series is available here.

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Electric Utility Spending on Relay Testing, Use of WANs for Remote Access

Here are some excerpts from previous Protection and Control studies; some of these topics will be revisited in our 2016 survey.

Overall, do you plan to increase, decrease or maintain current levels of capital investment for relay testing equipment, software and training?
The overwhelming majority of the 2012 sample indicated that they plan to maintain their current CapEx levels for these activities. Sixteen percent said they would increase expenditures, and only one respondent indicated a decrease in CapEx. The 2009 findings had indicated that 70% of the respondents would maintain their 2009 level of investment in relay test equipment. Fifteen percent planned to increase such investment, while only eight percent planned a decrease.

Do you plan to rely more on third party services for relay testing?
PlannedCapexRelayTestingIn 2012, 20% of responding utilities said they plan to rely more in the coming three year period (2012-2014) on third party relay commissioning and testing services. One person mentioned that due to manpower shortages, they do not have enough personnel available to do testing as well as regular line work.

In 2009, only twelve percent had planned to use third party relay testing services. Nearly 25% of the 2006 survey sample indicated that they would be likely to rely more heavily on third party relay testing services. The 2009 cutback in spending for third party services may well have been due to the impact of the recession, and the significant erosion of CAPEX and OPEX spending in that year.

Do you operate a Wide Area Network (WAN) for remote access to relays?
Fifty-three percent of utility respondents overall said they operate a WAN for remote relay access. Surprisingly, 71% of investor owned utilities said they do not operate a WAN for remote access.

How do you operate a Wide Area Network (WAN) for remote access to relays?
Of the 42 utilities in the sample that operate a WAN, 71% operate the WAN via serial port terminal servers or data concentrators, and 62% indicated they operate the WAN through firewalls. Almost all utilities had a multi-pronged approach to operating their WANs.

For more information on the forthcoming update to the worldwide study of the protective relay marketplace, call 1 410 465 7316 or send an email inquiry to info@newton-evans.com

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Worldwide Study of the Protective Relay Marketplace in Electric Utilities: 2016-2018

Newton-Evans is in the planning stages of updating one of its flagship report series on the Worldwide Protective Relay Marketplace, slated for completion in the second quarter of 2016.

If you are a supplier of protective relays, relay testing or integration services, or if you are interested in following technology trends, we invite you to contact us to let us know what questions, comments or concerns you have about this $2.5 billion world market.

Send us an email to relaymarket@newton-evans.com with any ideas you have, or if you are interested in pre-subscribing to this report series. Pre-subscribers are encouraged to help us design the survey/questionnaire which goes out to hundreds of electric utility decision makers and planners around the world by submitting from 2-5 questions for consideration.

Overview
Newton-Evans’ Worldwide Study of the Protective Relay Marketplace: 2016-2018 is planned to be a multi-client study which encompasses the world market for protective relays in the electric utility industry. This four volume report series will be the seventh worldwide study of protective relays which Newton-Evans has undertaken. Participants in this market study will include utility engineers and managers from investor-owned utilities, municipal and provincial utilities, cooperative utilities within the United States and Canada, together with national power systems throughout the world. The study will measure current market sizes and contains projections on a world region basis for the next several years. The entire research program will define the product and market requirements which suppliers must meet in order to successfully participate in one or more of these diverse world market regions.

Newton-Evans Research Company estimates from an earlier 2012 relay market study indicate that the North American protective relay market stood at almost $600 million for both utility and industrial applications. It will be interesting to see how changes in the world market since completion of the 2012-2014 study will affect the outlook for 2016-2018.

Methodology
Field survey work is conducted using a mix of primary research methods including personal interviews, mail surveys, faxes, e-mail and follow-up telephone interviews by Newton-Evans Research Company staff. In addition to discussions with utility managers and influencers, Newton-Evans conducts interviews with protective relay industry officials to gather management impressions about the size, scope, direction and trends in the relay business. Discussions and information exchanges with international suppliers provide additional market insight. Over the past 15 years Newton-Evans has received thousands of completed surveys from utility personnel.

Topics
The survey-based findings in Volumes 1 (North American Market) and 2 (International Market) will discuss the following:

  • Number of relays to be purchased over the 2016-2018 period
  • Percentage of digital/microprocessor relays in installed base and planned for new and retrofit applications purchases
  • Estimates of annual budgets for protective relay hardware purchases
  • Level of testing for new digital relays
  • Communications approaches for wide area networks
  • Relay communications protocol requirements
  • Types of relay scheme redundancy used for microprocessor-based relaying terminals
  • Third party services for relay testing
  • Level of implementation of IEC 61850
  • Uses of IEC 61850 within substation, for protection, control, and SCADA
  • Use fiber optics to connect substations
  • Outsourcing trends for testing, engineering, integration
  • Use of condition based maintenance to reduce maintenance testing time of technicians

Volume 3 will provide a market forecast for the relay market through 2018. The survey sample from volumes 1 and 2 will be analyzed by world percentage of distribution line miles, transmission line miles, number of substations, nameplate capacity (as it applies to generator protection), and number of medium to large transformers included in the sample. This data is then used to estimate factory shipments according to type of relay (electromechanical vs. solid state), market segment (North American utilities, International utilities, and IPP/Industrial/OEMs), relay application (substation equipment, generators/motors, transmission lines, or distribution feeders), and market share by relay manufacturer.

Volume 4 profiles several of the major relay manufacturers and related equipment providers such as ABB, Alstom Grid, Basler, Beckwith, Cooper, Cutler Hammer, FKI, GE Multilin, Nari, RFL, Schneider, SEL, Siemens, and ZIV. Product descriptions and key contacts are provided, as well as reported 2014 and 2015 revenues where available.

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U.S. Market for Feeder Protection Relays

According to GE Digital Energy, a feeder protection relay can provide primary circuit protection on distribution networks and backup/auxiliary protection for transformers, generators and motors. With a total estimated market of about $60 million in direct sales to the nation’s electric utilities, this total is expected to grow to $72 million by the end of 2014. Modern (digital/numeric) feeder relays are a key segment of the overall substation modernization and distribution automation equipment market. Feeder relays are just one of 84 types of electric T&D equipment and services discussed in the Newton-Evans report series, Overview of the U.S. Transmission and Distribution Equipment Market, which is presently being updated to reflect year-end 2013 U.S. market values and provide market forecasts and outlook through year-end 2016.  This summary of feeder relay activity is typical of the information contained in each of the 84 reports.  Market segment shares for suppliers are also provided in each report.  Here are a few of Newton-Evans’ observations on this important market segment taken from the 2011 market overview series as well as the Worldwide Study of the Protective Relay Marketplace In Electric Utilities: 2012-2014.

Average Unit Price Range:
Distribution feeder relays have been recently priced between $900 and $1,800 depending on whether or not other features like over-current protection are included.

Major Manufacturers:
ABB: REF615R Feeder Protection and Control, REF series
Basler: BE1-11f system
Beckwith: M7651
Cooper (now owned by Eaton): iDP210
Eaton: CH-Series, E-Series
GE: M Family, SR 3 350, F650
SEL: 751, 751a, 351S
ZIV: IRV, DRV
ERLPhase: F-Pro

Findings from the Worldwide Study of the Protective Relay Marketplace In Electric Utilities: 2012-2014 Volume 1 – North American Market:
The 2012 survey findings suggested a likely increase in purchase plans for transmission line relays and distribution feeder relays. In 2012, as in previous studies, distribution feeder relays made up the largest portion of planned relay purchases over the 2012-2014 time frame. A significant share of all utility relay purchases (units) planned for this period were distribution feeder relays.

The earlier 2009 study findings had indicated that distribution feeder relays were the “best-selling” and most widely used type of protective relay within the utility segment, even though redundancy in the distribution grid was not nearly as common as found in transmission applications. About 40% of the total number of units planned for purchase during the forecast period was to be distribution feeder relays.

Digital vs. Electromechanical
In 2012 the survey respondents indicated that 60% of distribution feeder relays in their installed base  were digital/microprocessor relays. This percentage continues to grow as more digital relays are added to the current system every year. The earlier 2009 study observed that 53% of the installed base was digital, with 97% of planned unit purchases likely to be digital as well.  As recently as 1999, the split was 50-50 (electro-mechanical versus digital/numeric).


To stay up to date on our progress with the Overview of the 2014-2016 U.S. Transmission and Distribution Equipment Market, sign up for our newsletter by emailing with the subject line “subscribe.” Visit our reports page for more information and to download a report brochure.